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Thread: Honda S2000 Based Sport Compact!

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    Default Honda S2000 Based Sport Compact!

    Sorry not good at all in Japanese! I hope @OsakaBoy is here to translate
    Honda S2000 Based Sport Compact! -468375


    Honda S2000 Based Sport Compact! -468376


    "The value of life can be measured by how many times your soul has been deeply stirred." Soichiro Honda

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    lol:

    The S2000’s rotary dials and cheap plastic switches wouldn’t seem out of place in a ’78 Toyota Corolla

    source: http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/content/110808087730017428/
    ,,, unless you know the track, you're not good enough to sit behind the wheel." K T

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    Debut 2008
    its to good a shape to wait for
    Life is short and very unpredictable just like a Quarter mile .....

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    When the S2000 debuted four years ago, it screamed its way into automotive enthusiasts' hearts with a racing-derived engine singing a 9000-rpm song, a hyper-alert chassis, and a driver-focused cabin equipped with bespoke if somewhat bizarre instruments. We last spent time with the S2000 only three months ago, when we tested a 2003 model against the new Nissan 350Z roadster, the Porsche Boxster, and the BMW Z4 ("Four of a Kind," August 2003). During that comparison, the S2000 performed brilliantly on the racetrack, where it demonstrated sharper reflexes than Venus Williams and a ballerina-like ability to pivot about its axis, but the price for the high revs and the track-time smiles was a shortage of low-end torque and a surplus of road noise from the powerful but frenetic 2.0-liter four-cylinder. We deemed the wee Honda "a specialized car for specialized circumstances."
    Overly harsh? Harsh is what happens to your eardrums after you drive the old S2000 for a couple of hours on the freeway, because the VTEC engine delivers the goods only between 6000 and 9000 rpm. Clearly, we were not the only people bothered by the flight of the bumblebees, because chief among a PowerPoint presentation's worth of changes for the 2004 S2000 is a bigger, quieter, calmer, and torquier engine. With an increase in the piston stroke from 84.0 mm to 90.7 mm, the S2000's engine now displaces almost 2200 cubic centimeters, rather than 2000, but the name is unchanged. Power remains the same at 240 horsepower but peaks at a slightly more peaceful 7800 rpm versus 8300 rpm. Torque rises slightly, from 153 to 161 pound-feet, and peaks at 6500 versus 7500 rpm.

    The S2000 now launches with considerably more verve, and its power band is more flexible between 1000 and 5000 rpm. The car is also more civilized on the highway, partly as a result of a slightly higher sixth-gear ratio. On an early-morning foray into the red-rock canyons outside Las Vegas, my co-driver and I spoke, rather than yelled, to each other in the top-down cabin.

    The new S2000 still lives for track time. Switching back and forth between 2003 and 2004 models at Spring Mountain Motorsports Park, we found things to like about both cars. The old car's smaller, narrower tires (205/55R-16 front, 225/50R-16 rear) allow for easier sliding around corners, which is an enjoyable way to spend three seconds of your life, if not always the most efficient way to get from apex to apex. And there were times in the 2004 car when it really could have used the extra 1000 revolutions of the outgoing car's engine—the redline is now only 8000 rpm.

    But to the new car's credit, the engine's greater grunt provides better acceleration out of slow-speed corners, and the newly standard seventeen-inch rubber—215/45R-17 front, 245/40R-17 rear—provides better grip both diving into and barreling out of turns. We could not detect any differences between gearboxes—for 2004, the first five forward gears are lower—but the old gearbox was already super-sweet. The steering feels identical, a bit dead on-center but otherwise quite communicative. Brakes, as before, are great, and the S2000 remains a heel-and-toe champ. Honda claims a 0-to-60-mph time of less than six seconds, and the car feels as light and lithe as ever. Curb weight rises a scant 24 pounds to 2835, mainly because of the bigger footwear.

    The S2000, although attractive enough, always has been afraid to make a visual show of itself—the wrong idea for a topless ride. Honda tries to make things more interesting for '04, but it's more of a Botox treatment than a comprehensive face-lift. Front and rear bumpers are new, oval tailpipes replace round, and both headlights and taillights have more modern triple-beam designs. All other body panels, even the hood, are unchanged.

    The red starter button and most other interior controls carry over, but thinner door panels increase elbow and shoulder room slightly, fake aluminum trim brightens up the cabin, and there are now two cup holders, one for your Evian and one for your cell phone. By definition, all roadsters are "specialized cars for specialized circumstances," yet the circumstances under which the S2000 can be driven comfortably have expanded to include roads that don't have candy-striped curbs in the corners. But when it's time for a completely new S2000, we'd like to see some styling with as much attitude as the rest of the car.
    -

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    It's a total lie. Honda says the second-generation S2000 is a kinder, gentler car. ********. Don't believe it. The S2000 is still the real deal, a sports car stripped to a core of dynamic purity. That said, Honda has made a long list of changes to the S2000 for 2004, including an increase of engine displacement, meant to make the car friendlier on the street. And the changes do make the two-seater a bit easier to live with, but to say the roadster has cast aside its hyperactive ways is like saying Barry Bonds no longer hits for power.
    To improve torque output, Honda engineers have stroked the all-aluminum four-cylinder 6.7mm to deliver another 160cc of displacement and a slightly undersquare configuration. By Honda's measurement, there's still 240 hp at your command, only it arrives at 7800 rpm, some 500 rpm lower than previously delivered. This is because the increase in piston speed from the long-stroke layout would stress the internals to the breaking point at a higher rpm. It's one of those physics things. The engine's redline has also been lowered 700 rpm to 8000 rpm.

    It worked. The new engine shows an increase in output of between four and 10 percent across the powerband, and Honda's dyno curve shows a big improvement in torque at 3500 rpm, where the engine really starts to pull. Our chassis dyno backed up those claims. The 2.2-liter made 210 hp at 8000 rpm at the rear wheels, compared to the 203 hp at 8500 rpm that the old 2.0-liter delivered, and 146 lb-ft of torque at 6400 rpm, compared to 136 lb-ft at 6300 rpm. Sure, peak power remains the name of the game here, but there's obviously more power than Honda is telling us, and the improved midrange is nice around town.

    As before, the power is tough to access at the dragstrip, because the clutch starts to fade into lifelessness after just a couple of high-rpm launches. And, just as before, you either have to drop the clutch and live with the inevitable wheelspin, or start with a modest number of rpm and wait for the VTEC to pull you out of the hole.

    Fortunately, the S2000 now accelerates quicker. It pulls to 100 mph in 15.10 seconds, which is 0.2 seconds quicker than before. And there's also an improvement in roll-on acceleration, the kind of performance you feel on the street, because it accelerates 0.18 seconds quicker to 70 mph from 50 mph. Before the clutch went, we also measured a 0-to-60-mph time of 6.4 seconds and a quarter-mile run of 14.4 seconds at 97.2 mph, which are also quicker.

    While everybody is talking about the engine tweaks, it's really the chassis that has been changed the most. Honda has dramatically changed the handling balance of the S2000 to give it a more fail-safe personality on the street. We circled the skidpad with the '04 S2000 and registered 0.89 g, down from the 0.92 g the previous car achieved. The car also understeered every yard of the way, no matter what we did to get the rear end to step out. You might be tempted to look for an explanation in the '04 car's new 17-inch Bridgestone RE 050 tires, but there's far more to it than that.

    To start with, the front springs are 6.7 percent stiffer, and the shocks are tuned to suit. The rear springs are 10.0 percent softer, and the rear anti-roll bar is softer as well. Once you add rear tires that are 30mm wider than the fronts (instead of just 20mm as before), it's clear that the rear of the car is going to hang on until after the front tires give up.

    We can hear howls of protest from the self-styled handling experts, especially once they learn that the '04 car's steering is also fractionally slower than before. It's no wonder the S2000 now understeers on the skidpad, they'll say. But when you take a look at our slalom test, a measurement of the S2000's ability to change direction without a loss of control, the car's speed improves by 1.2 mph to 71.0 mph, which is what you'd predict from the hardware changes. So far we think this new balance is for the better.

    We also like the revised tachometer with closer numbers, and the car's mild facelift.

    Still, the S2000 takes a big breath of commitment before you climb behind the wheel and hit the highway. Even though it has acquired another cupholder (for a total of two) for '04, this two-seater is still as close to a superbike as you can get on four wheels. No matter what Honda says, there isn't a shred of civilized insulation from its hyper-aggressive personality and as great as this car is on the right road, the awful, unmusical thrashing from the engine will tire you out, its cramped interior and the stiff-legged ride will wear you down. A Mitsubishi Lancer EVO VIII is a poster child for practicality in comparison.
    -

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    Honda S2000 Based Sport Compact! -626902


    Honda S2000 Based Sport Compact! -626903
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