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Thread: The Chinese cloning industry

  1. #1
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    BelligerentPacifist's Avatar
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    Default The Chinese cloning industry

    Datz bhai has shown his disgust at QQ because it was a ripoff of the Matiz. Some people seem to like this car because it has more features than its competition. If QQ was really good and justified its pricetag, why didn't Chery give it its own identity, why did they have to steal some other car's face? What I think the reason can be is people who have the choice between an original and a knockoff ALWAYS campare the original's credentials with the copy's pricetag..."why spend 6.5 lacs on the Matiz when we can get a car that looks just the same for 4.9". They save 33% of their budget and buy second best.

    Not that that's a problem with me.

    But now some Chonois company's copied the RR Phantom. They should atleast spared an icon. This, however, is a problem with me and many people around the globe who idolize over-engineered, uber-luxurious cars like these.

    I came accross this article, and I want to puke. Please read the entire thing and you'd want to too:

    "
    Invasion of the Chinese clones
    Brazen copies of western models, even down to the badge, are a growing worry for our car makers, say Jay Nagley and Emma Smith of The Sunday Times



    Not content with cornering the market in sports goods, electrical and DIY products, the Chinese are building one of the world’s biggest car industries based on models that bear more than a passing resemblance to western brands. In fact many of them are indistinguishable, right down to the badge on the bonnet.

    Chinese technicians have become so skilled at reverse engineering that their western counterparts have to look closely to tell the difference. This could be good news for consumers, bringing the prospect of half-price vehicles. But it’s bad news for the car companies that have invested time and money establishing brands only to see them duplicated.

    General Motors was one of the first to suffer an attack of the clones when China’s Chery Automobile apparently ran blueprints for the Daewoo (now renamed Chevrolet for the European market) Matiz through a photocopier to come up with its QQ. “A Matiz door can fit on a QQ and a QQ bonnet fits on the Matiz,” a GM spokesman said.

    The Hongqi (Red Flag) HQD, a cheap rip-off of the Rolls-Royce Phantom, was unveiled at the Chinese motor show in August. Although only a concept car, a production model is predicted to cost about £130,000, compared with £216,950 for the Phantom. Other copycats include the Shuanghuan Laibao SRV, which appears to be a recycled version of the Honda CR-V but with a £6,700 pricetag — less than half the cost of the Japanese original. Its badge looks borrowed from Audi, minus two of the German brand’s rings.

    Great Wall Automobile has been accused of copying the Nissan Frontier pick-up with its Sing SUVs, and a company called Geely, based in Hangzhou in eastern China, appears to have chopped the front and rear off a Mercedes C-class and welded them into a compact car called the Merrie. BYD’s aping of BMW looks is even more blatant. Its black, white and blue badge is “inspired” by the German company’s and its F6 closely resembles the BMW 7-series.

    What began as a minor irritation is to become a major commercial headache as China prepares to sell its cars to the West. Towards the end of last year the JiangLing Landwind SUV became the first Chinese car to be marketed in Europe. It is uncannily similar to the Vauxhall Frontera, which ceased production at the end of 2003. JiangLing denies the charge. “It’s all a misunderstanding; we have our own design teams,” said a senior marketing executive at the company last summer.

    JiangLing has agreed to make adjustments to improve the vehicle’s safety after the ADAC, the German equivalent of the Automobile Association, subjected the Landwind to crash tests with results that it described as “catastrophic”.

    Safety flaws notwithstanding, European manufacturers fear it is only a matter of time before customers can take advantage of the Landwind’s enviable £10,000-£12,000 pricetag.

    Great Wall Automobile is set to launch its Hover SUV and Deer pick-up in Europe this year. Like JiangLing, it will initially use a loophole in the law to bypass rigorous crash tests: there are exemptions designed to help low-volume producers and manufacturers of commercial vehicles.

    While western car makers may be horrified by China’s blatant commandeering of their ideas, they are also understandably wary of making enemies in the world’s fastest growing car market. Every major car company is desperate to get a slice of the Chinese sales boom. To do this the Chinese government usually requires them to form an alliance with a Chinese company and, although the communist regime may be embracing capitalism, all large investments have to be cleared by the authorities.

    Even if a foreign company decides to sue a Chinese firm, getting a Chinese judge to rule in its favour is not easy. Honda is embroiled in a case against Shuanghuan Auto over the Laibao SRV but has already had to fend off a counter- suit from the Chinese firm. Toyota failed to win a case against Geely in 2003 for copying its logo. There were indications of a change of attitude when last month Honda won a ruling that bars Chongqing Lifan Industrial from selling motorcycles under the Hongda name.

    The controversy over the QQ has been settled between Chery and General Motors with “a gentleman’s agreement” and Chery has cancelled plans to launch its Matiz in the US. “There is no chance of that car being sold out of China and encroaching on our business,” said Denis Chick, a GM spokesman in the UK.

    Mercedes is philosophical about its Chinese rivals. “Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery,” said Rob Halloway, a spokesman. “The difference between a copy and a genuine Mercedes-Benz should be clear to see — it’s not the same as a fake Rolex. Cars are still fairly sophisticated technology.”

    But established car makers cannot afford to be complacent. Backed by cheap state capital and with low-cost labour, Chinese firms can cut European prices by half and many plan to double or even quadruple output within just a few years. Chery has ambitious (although some say not entirely realistic) plans to export up to 250,000 vehicles to the US by 2008 (its total current output is about 80,000 vehicles a year). “In the future it will be private Chinese companies that rule the industry, ” Li Shufu, Geely’s chairman, said in a recent interview.

    The profits from the sales of this first generation of Chinese copycats could well be used to finance a new range of designs, posing an even greater menace to their European counterparts.

    The signs are already there. Brilliance, one of China’s largest car companies, is upgrading its Zhonghua luxury saloon — a potential rival to its European partner BMW — to include air-conditioning and a state-of-the-art sound system, with plans to sell to Europe by 2008 for as little as £13,000.

    "

    Here's the link:
    http://driving.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,22750-2012852,00.html

    What do you blokes say to this?


  2. #2
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    Default

    CHAINA CHAH GAYYA HAYGA HAR PAASAY!!!!


    {:-]
    KNOW THYSELF!---When it is dark enough, you can see the stars---Is it us who live in fantasy, or is it reality, which is unreal.---The thoughts you have,is the stuff you are--Billy was a thirsty boy but now he is no more, cause' what he thought was H2O was H2SO4.

  3. #3
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    Default

    Herr Holloway at Mercedes is right. Remember the Japanese copied the Americans in the fourties and fifties, but scaled down.

    Now I believe that if someone is willing to work hard and charge less for it they deserve what they achieve.

    Learning by reverse engineering is common in America, but outright laser scanning and making identical components is indeed wrong.

    If one really has a problem with this they shouldn't support the copiers.

    But is this really all that different than pirated movies? How many people do you know, or do you yourself allow pirated DVDs in your home? As an inventor, I forbid this. We need to respect the ideas and efforts of the creators, but also one can learn from them.

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    Default

    In China everything is copied. What to talk about cars, aeroplane and space technology is based on reverse engineering. Despite the fact every automaker still want to come in this market as it is expected that in 2006 6.5 million cars will be sold in China (second largest car market in the world). Every third day a new model is introduced. Sometimes you have to stop look closely and then look more closely, to see if it is an european / japanese or chinese brand. All DVDs are released a week earlier then the actual release of films in hollywood. Government does not care about IPR as long as the masses are being benefitted. Is it good or bad, I reserve my comments.
    Drive safe, life is precious

  5. #5
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    Default

    Copied products of China have both sides, the good and bad to them.

    The good, is their cheap prices, which is benefitting everyone in the world, including those countries whose company's products they copy. In US, Europe, Japan, there are coutless copied goods made in China. Infact, the largest retailer in the World, WALMART of US, exclusively sells mostly China made goods that they directly make in China.

    The bad side. The layoffs, and jobs losses due to plants being shutdown around the world. The Walmart store I have talked about above, in US, is responsible for shutting down countless smaller family run businesses, that used to sell anything from Bicycles, to clothes, to household goods, and everything else, other than an automobile, that a house may need.
    Now, as this article points out those automobiles, that are not at WALMART yet, are also their next target. LoL. Maybe who knows, in future they can make an autodealership named WALMART AUTO, where you'll be buying China made Cars soon as well, at a fraction of price of the cars they are copying... LoL...

    As far as Pakistan is concerned. Alot of factories are suffering, as I read in some local newspaper, when I was in Pakistan in December-2005, due to China made goods prevailing in every shop and street corner. They are under cutting the costs due to heavy industrial subsidies being provided by China Government to Electricity producers, Gas suppliers, raw material providers and other infrastructure, that is ultimately linked in this Chain of production that comes out of China.

    Plus another big thing that make China good cheap, is the stubborness of China Government to Float its Currency. It is currently, Artificially Deflated, to make it look cheaper than it really is. This helps China tremendously, as when any currency, when it is weaker against the home currency you are selling too, your goods will be cheaper and attractive to the buyers. US government had been pressuring China Government to properly establish its currency in International Market and let is float, as the China economy booms, its currency will also rise and hense its product become more in line with its economic strength. Japan, once also did the same thing, artificially lower its value, and now One US dollars buys around 110 or so Japanese Yens.

    We all will loose at the end, the jobs are exploding in China at the cost of Job losses in USA, JAPAN, EUROPE, once the proud industrial Giants, and even in third world countries like Pakistan, the impact of China's boom is being felt as many factories are unable to keep up with China's super massively subsidized, government backed, capital flush industrial complex.
    Permanent positive change (in your life, or the society) with proper planning occurs slowly. While without planning any change becomes a disaster rather quickly. Said by Whocares...

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    MotownMan, I feel bad each time I buy a pirated CD. Just consider how much effort somebody's put into it, and you're robbing him blind.

    But beyond feeling bad for sometime, the stuff inside the CD come's almost free. And its all good.

    Pretty much explains why people buy copies of things, including cars.

    The only thing I object to is, a good Chinese car can make its own niche, why does it steal some other car's shape??

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    Default

    @bell..
    Now you come to point.

    Be patient, they are learning to walk. When they run, every one will still find it cheaper than an American, German even Japanese.
    So let the time tell. In the mean time enjoy the luxury having in half price

    And don' compare them with pirate DVDs, DVDs are for sure pirated, and it is universally apprehended and accepted

    These cars have their cases in legislation yet, or amicable settlement. So these are not pirating cases as yet. So not a pirate case such as DVDs. Cheers
    Aftermath...be prepared

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