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Thread: Mini fan club

  1. #1
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    Default Mini fan club

    As the beetle fan club goes fromstrength to strength I though it shuld be fair to open a Mini thread as well for owners 7 previous owners to share teir thoughts on the classic mini.

    NO NEW MINIS PLEASE - this is stictly for the classics from the humble mini City to the mental MIVIC (see below).


    Mini fan club -477592


    Mini fan club -477593
    1. A car is only worth what someone is willing to pay for it, 2. Resale wont save your life in an accident, 3. Genius has limits, stupidity has none, 4. Never argue with an idiot, they will bring you down to their level & beat you with experience, 5. Growing old beats the alternative -- dying young! 6. انّا للہ و انّا الیہ راجعون

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    The Mk I Mini — 1959 to 1967

    The production version of the Mini was demonstrated to the press in April 1959, and by August several thousand cars had been produced ready for the first sales.[8]

    The name Mini did not appear by itself immediately — the first models being marketed under two of BMC's brand names, Austin and Morris. The name Austin Seven (sometimes written as SE7EN in early publicity material) recalled the popular small Austin of the 1920s and 1930s. The other name used in the United Kingdom, Morris Mini-Minor, seems to have been a play on words. The Morris Minor was a well known and successful car, with the word minor being Latin for "smaller"; so an abbreviation of the Latin word for "smallest" — minimus — was used for the new even smaller car.

    Until 1962 the cars appeared as the Austin 850 and Morris 850 in North America and France, and in Denmark as the Austin Partner (until 1964) and Morris Mascot (until 1981). The name Mini was first used to name the car in 1961,[9] somewhat to the surprise of the Sharps Commercials car company (later known as Bond Cars Ltd) who had been using the name Minicar for their three-wheeled vehicles since 1949. However, legal action was somehow averted,[10] and BMC used the name Mini for the remainder of the life of the car.[11]

    In 1964 the suspension in the higher-end models was replaced by another Moulton design, the hydrolastic system. The new suspension created a softer ride, but it also increased weight and production cost and, in the minds of many enthusiasts, spoiled the handling characteristics for which the Mini was so famous. In 1971 the original rubber suspension reappeared and was retained for the remaining life of the Mini.

    From October 1965 the option of an Automotive Products (AP) designed four-speed automatic transmission became available.

    Although they were slow at the outset, sales were strong across most of the model lines in the 1960s, with a total of 1,190,000 Mk I's being produced.[12] The basic Mini never made money for its makers because it sold at less than its production cost. This may have been necessary in order to compete with its rivals, but it is rumoured that this was actually due to an accounting error.[5] Some profits came from the popular deluxe models and from optional accessories, which included items such as seat belts, door mirrors and a radio that would be considered necessities on modern cars.

    The Mini etched its place into popular culture in the 1960s with well-publicised purchases by film and music stars.


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    The Mk II Mini — 1967 to 1969

    From 1967 to 1970, Issigonis had been designing a replacement for the Mini in the form of an experimental model called the 9X. It was shorter and more powerful than the Mini, but due to politicking inside British Leyland (which had now been formed by the merger of BMC and Standard Triumph), the car was not built. It was an intriguing "might-have-been"; the car was technologically advanced, and many believe it would have been competitive up until the 1980s.

    The Mk II Mini featured a redesigned front grille which remained with the car from that point on — also a larger rear window and numerous cosmetic changes. 429,000 Mk II Minis were made.

    A bewildering variety of Mini types were made in Pamplona, Spain, by the Authi company from 1968 onwards, mostly under the Morris name.

    The Mini was arguably the star of the 1969 film The Italian Job, which features a car chase in which a gang of thieves drive three Minis down staircases, through storm drains, over buildings and finally into the back of a moving bus. This movie was remade in 2003 using the new MINI.


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    @ beeberg

    (y).....gud info....

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    Variants

    The popularity of the original Mini spawned many models that targeted different markets

    The Wolseley Hornet and Riley Elf (1961–69)
    Intended to be small, luxurious cars with a more substantial boot and a more sophisticated looking front grille. The name "Wolseley Hornet" was a revival of a 1930s sports car marque, while the name "Elf" recalled the Riley Sprite and Imp sports cars, also of the 1930s. Both cars went through three versions. Initially they used the 850 cc engine, changing to a single carburettor version of the Cooper's 998 cc power unit in the MkII in 1963. The MKIII facelift of 1966 brought wind-up windows and concealed door hinges two years before these were seen on the mainstream Mini. 30,912 Riley Elfs and 28,455 Wolseley Hornets were built.

    1968 Mk III Riley Elf



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    The Morris Mini Traveller and the Austin Mini Countryman (1961–69, UK only)
    Two-door estate cars with double "barn"-style rear doors. Both were built on a slightly longer chassis of 84 inches (2.14 m) compared to 80.25 inches (2.04 m) for the saloon. The luxury models had decorative, non-structural wood inserts in the rear body which gave the car some of the look of an American-style 1950s Woodie. Approximately 108,000 Austin Countrymen and 99,000 Morris Travellers were built.

    The Mini Van (1960–82)
    A commercial panel van rated at 1/4 ton load capacity. Built on the longer Traveller chassis but without side windows, it proved popular in 1960s Britain as a cheaper alternative to the car as it was classed as a commercial vehicle and carried no sales tax. It was renamed as the Mini 95 in 1978, the number representing the gross vehicle weight of 0.95 tons. 521,494 were built.

    Mini countryman

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    The Mini Pick-up (1961–82)
    A pick-up truck derivative. Also built on the longer chassis but with a flatbed and a tailgate. Like the van, it was renamed as the Mini 95 in 1978. Neither the van nor the pickup had a costly chrome grille - a simple set of stamped metal slots provided airflow into the engine compartment. 58,179 Mini pickups were built.

    Mini pickup truck


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    The Mini Moke (1964 and 1968 in the UK, 1966–82 in Australia and 1983–89 in Portugal)
    A bizarre utility vehicle, this jeep lookalike was first designed for the British Army. But without good ground clearance or four-wheel drive, it proved unsuitable for military use, although it enjoyed some popularity in civilian production. About 50,000 Mokes were produced.The Mini Moke featured in the cult 1967 TV series The Prisoner and has proved popular in holiday locations such as Barbados and Macau – where Mokes were used as police cars and could be rented as recently as March 2006.
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    The Mini Cooper and Cooper S – 1961–2000
    Issigonis' friend John Cooper, owner of the Cooper Car Company, designer and builder of Formula 1 and rally cars, saw the potential of the Mini. Issigonis was initially reluctant to see the Mini in the role of a performance car - but after John Cooper appealed to BMC management, the two men collaborated to create the Mini Cooper. The Austin Mini Cooper and Morris Mini Cooper debuted in 1961.

    The original 848 cc engine from the Morris Mini-Minor was increased to 997 cc, boosting power from 34 bhp to 55 bhp (25 to 41 kW). The car featured a racing-tuned engine, double SU carburettors, close-ratio gearbox and front disc brakes, uncommon at the time in a small car. One thousand units of this iteration were commissioned by management, intended for and designed to meet the homologation rules of Group 2 rally racing. The 997 cc engine was replaced by a shorter stroke 998 cc unit in 1964.

    A more powerful Mini Cooper, dubbed the "S", was developed in tandem and released in 1963. Featuring a 1071 cc engine and larger servo-assisted disc brakes, 4,030 Cooper S cars were produced and sold until the model was updated in August 1964. Cooper also produced two models specifically for circuit racing, rated at 970 cc and a 1275 cc, both of which were also offered to the public. The smaller-engine model was not well received, and only 963 were built until the model was discontinued in 1965. The 1275 cc Cooper S models were discontinued in 1971.

    Sales of the Mini Cooper were as follows: 64,000 Mk I Coopers with 997 or 998 cc engines; 19,000 Mk I Cooper S with 970, 1071 or 1275 cc engines; 16,000 Mk II Coopers with 998 cc engines; 6,300 Mk II Cooper S with 1275 cc engines. There were no Mk III Coopers and just 1,570 Mk III Cooper S's.

    The Mini Cooper S earned acclaim with Monte Carlo Rally victories in 1964, 1965, and 1967. Minis were initially placed first, second and third in the 1966 rally as well, but were disqualified after a controversial decision by the French judges. The disqualification related to the use of a variable resistance headlamp dimming circuit in place of a dual-filament lamp. It should be noted that the Citroën DS that was eventually awarded first place had illegal white headlamps but escaped disqualification. The driver of the Citroën, Pauli Toivonen, was reluctant to accept the trophy and vowed that he would never race for Citroën again. BMC probably received more publicity from the disqualification than they would have gained from a victory - but had the Mini not been disqualified, it would have been the only car in history to be placed amongst the Monte Carlo winners for six consecutive years.

    In 1971 the Mini Cooper design was licensed in Italy by Innocenti and in 1973 to Spain by Authi (Automoviles de Turismo Hispano-Ingleses), which began to produce the Innocenti Mini Cooper 1300 and the Authi Mini Cooper 1300, respectively.

    A new Mini Cooper named the RSP (Rover Special Products) was briefly relaunched in 1990 to 1991, with slightly lower performance than the 1960s Cooper. It proved so popular that the new Cooper-marked Mini went into full production in late 1991. From 1992 Coopers were fitted with a fuel-injected version of the 1275 cc engine, and in 1997 a multi-point fuel injected engine was introduced, along with a front-mounted radiator and various safety improvements

    The Mini Clubman and 1275GT – 1969 to 1980


    Mini fan club -650850


    Mini clubman 1976

    In 1969 under the ownership of British Leyland, the Mini was given a facelift by stylist Roy Haynes, who had previously worked for Ford. The restyled version was called the Mini Clubman, and sported a more square frontal look, similar to that of the much larger Austin Maxi. (In fact, the Clubman and 1275GT shared exactly the same indicator/sidelight assembly as the Maxi.) The Mini Clubman was intended to replace the upmarket Riley and Wolseley versions. A new model, dubbed the 1275GT, was slated as the replacement for the 998 cc Mini Cooper. (The 1275 cc Mini Cooper S continued alongside the 1275GT for two years until 1971.) The Clubman Estate took over where the Countryman and Traveller left off.

    The 1275GT is often incorrectly described as the "Mini Clubman 1275GT". The official name was always just the "Mini 1275GT", and it was a separate, distinct model from the Clubman (albeit, it shared the same frontal treatment as the Mini Clubman, and was launched at the same time).

    In 1971, the 1275 cc Mini Cooper S was discontinued, leaving the Mini 1275GT as the only sporting mini on sale in the UK for the rest of the decade. (Innocenti in Italy, however, continued making their own version of the Mini Cooper for some time.) While not as quick as a 1275 Mini Cooper S, the 1275GT was cheaper to buy, run, and insure. It was the first Mini to be fitted with a tachometer. It also featured a standard-fit close-ratio gearbox. Performance of the 1275GT was lively for the time, achieving 0–60 mph in 12.9 seconds, and the excellent midrange torque offered a 30–50 mph time in fourth gear of only 9 seconds. The bluff front-end, however, meant that the model would struggle to attain a 90 mph top speed. The 1275 cc A-series engine could be cheaply and easily tuned, though the cheap purchase price and prominent "sidewinder" door stripes meant that this model developed a reputation as something of a "boy-racer special" during the '70s and into the '80s.

    The Mini Clubman and 1275GT were responsible for two motoring "firsts". They were the first vehicles to use a flexi printed-circuit board behind the dash instruments (universal nowadays, but technically advanced for 1969). Secondly, the 1275GT was the first vehicle to be offered with run-flat tyres; from 1974 this model could be ordered with optional Dunlop Denovo tyres on 12-inch diameter rims. In the event of a puncture, the Dunlop Denovo tyre would not burst and quickly deflate, but could continue to be used safely at speeds of up to 50 mph. This was a useful safety feature, although the increased road noise and relatively poor grip of this tyre meant that many 1275GT buyers ignored this option.

    Throughout the 1970s, British Leyland continued to produce the classic 1959 "round-front" design, alongside the newer Clubman and 1275GT models. The long-nose Clubman and 1275GT offered better crash safety, were better equipped, and had vastly better under-bonnet access, but were more expensive. The Mini Clubman and 1275GT were replaced in 1980 by the new hatchback Austin Metro, while production of the original "round-front" mini design continued for another 20 years. At the end of Clubman and 1275GT production, 275,583 Clubman saloons, 197,606 Clubman Estates and 110,673 1275GTs had been made
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    The Mk III and onwards – 1970 to 2000

    The Mk III Mini had a modified bodyshell with enough alterations to see the factory code change from ADO15 to ADO20 (which it shared with the Clubman). The most obvious changes were larger doors with concealed hinges.

    Customer demand led to the sliding windows being replaced with winding windows – although some Australian-manufactured Mk I Minis had adopted this feature several years earlier. The suspension reverted from Hydrolastic back to rubber as a cost-saving measure[23].

    Production at the Cowley plant was ended, and the simple name Mini completely replaced the separate Austin and Morris brands.

    MkIII introduced in November 1969 had wind up windows with internal door hinges except van and pickups. The boot lid lost the original hinged number plate and its recess shape and a large rear colour coded lamp was fitted in its place. Larger rear side windows.
    MkIV introduced in 1976 had a front rubber mounted subframe with single tower bolts and the rear frame had some larger bushes introduced. Twin stalk indicators were introduced with larger foot pedals. From 1977 on the rear indicator lamps had the reverse lights incorporated in them.
    MkV, all cars had 8.4 inch brake discs and plastic wheel arches but retained the same MkIV body shell shape.
    MkVI is 1990 on when where engine mounting points were moved forward to take 1275cc power units, and includes the HIF carb version and plus the single point fuel injected car which came out in 1991. The 998cc power units were discontinued. Bonnet release fitted from 1992.
    MkVII is the final twin point injection with front mounted radiator.
    In the late 1970s, Innocenti introduced the Innocenti 90 and 120, Bertone-designed hatchbacks based on the Mini platform. Bertone also created a Mini Cooper equivalent, christened the Innocenti De Tomaso, that sported a 1275 cc turbocharged engine. Reports of the Mini's imminent demise surfaced again in 1980 with the launch of the Austin Mini-Metro (badging with the word mini in all lowercase). In 1981 in New Zealand, the Mini starred in a road trip movie directed by Geoff Murphy called Goodbye Pork Pie. The Mini was beginning to fall out of favour in many export markets, and South African, Australian, and New Zealand production all stopped around this time.

    Mini cooper

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    Through the 1980s and 1990s the British market enjoyed numerous "special editions" of the Mini, which shifted the car from a mass-market item into a fashionable icon. It was this image that perhaps helped the Mini become such an asset for BMW, which later bought the remnants of BMC as the Rover Group. It was even more popular in Japan, where it was seen as a retro-cool icon, and inspired many imitators.

    In 1994 under Bernd Pischetsrieder, a first cousin once removed of Issigonis, BMW took control of the Rover Group, which included the Mini, fitting an airbag to comply with European legislation. By 2000 Rover was still suffering massive losses, and BMW decided to dispose of most of the company: MG and Rover went to Phoenix, a new British consortium; and Land Rover went to Ford. BMW kept the Mini brand name and now sells a completely new car under the MINI name, technically unrelated to the old car but retaining the classic transverse 4 cylinder, front-wheel-drive configuration and some stylistic elements.

    Production of the original Mini outlasted its supposed replacement, the Austin Metro. The final Mini rolled off the assembly line in October 2000. A total of 5.3 million cars had been manufactured[12].

    The Mini was a cultural icon and shows up in movies such as The Bourne Identity (2002) as a beat-up but surprisingly capable vehicle for a car chase, or as in Lara Croft: Tomb Raider (2001) as a collectible fashion icon garaged alongside other classic sports cars.

    1994 Mini Tahiti Special Edition, complete with Tahiti Blue metallic paintwork and Minilite-style wheels.
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    Mini life span

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    @beeberg

    bas kar bhai lunch time ho gya hee jaoo ab khana wana kha ker aaaoooo..................................lolz

    anyway nice info..................
    Ahsan Qureshi

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    @beeberg
    Thanks for making this the type of thread i had in mind. I appreciate you sharing what you know about the mini here. Keep it up.
    1. A car is only worth what someone is willing to pay for it, 2. Resale wont save your life in an accident, 3. Genius has limits, stupidity has none, 4. Never argue with an idiot, they will bring you down to their level & beat you with experience, 5. Growing old beats the alternative -- dying young! 6. انّا للہ و انّا الیہ راجعون

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    @STORM

    SAMEER BAHI AIK VW MIL RAHEE HE VERY CHEEP PRICE PER 1970 MODEL LAHORE NO. HEE 2OD KE FRONT SEATS & STERING HEE. COMPLETE RESOTREABLE HONE WALI HE R U INTERESTED???????
    Ahsan Qureshi

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    nah not yet,.. i'm still working on the 1303. thanks for thinking of me (though this is the mini page).
    1. A car is only worth what someone is willing to pay for it, 2. Resale wont save your life in an accident, 3. Genius has limits, stupidity has none, 4. Never argue with an idiot, they will bring you down to their level & beat you with experience, 5. Growing old beats the alternative -- dying young! 6. انّا للہ و انّا الیہ راجعون

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    @bee
    gr8 stuff bro
    Your opinions, my initials! - Formerly known as timelessfahad

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    @storm

    my pleasure bro, infact you started it dats better else i was going to start some thread for mini. my favo

    @timeless
    hope to see some stuff from you, i will try to upload more stuff related to mini.
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    @ahsenmq

    yar buri baat hai, mini ke thread mein vw ki baatein, acha yar tell me your add, now i will come to see you. wasay aaj mosam buhat zabardast hai
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    @BEEBERG

    U R WELLCOME
    Ahsan Qureshi

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    total era for BMC production:

    Mini Austin, Morris, Mini Cooper etc 1959-69

    Then it was outsourced to many counrtries.
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    Mini fan club -651097
    1. A car is only worth what someone is willing to pay for it, 2. Resale wont save your life in an accident, 3. Genius has limits, stupidity has none, 4. Never argue with an idiot, they will bring you down to their level & beat you with experience, 5. Growing old beats the alternative -- dying young! 6. انّا للہ و انّا الیہ راجعون

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