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Thread: Nessecary info and tips for bikers (Keep Posting)

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    Exclamation Nessecary info and tips for bikers (Keep Posting)

    Salam/Hi,

    I am posting some very useful tips and techniques for bikers. I hope that they will be beneficial for all of us. There are many experts here in PW, with respect i would like to welcome them to correct if there are any mistake so we should be "Educated Bikers".

    And any good information or Tips are welcomed here so If any one wants any GENERAL info about bikes this thread should do it ALL........

    Many thankS and Please Subscribe....

    You are to ride the machine, machine is not to ride you..

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    Lightbulb Types of bikes

    Motorcycles have, in recent years, become more focused and specialized in their function. Here are definitions of a few key types of bikes; to get a visual sense of the differences between these motorcycles.
    • Adventure/Touring, Dual Sports
      The offspring of rugged dirtbikes and long-distance tourers, these bikes boast lots of suspension travel and upright postures that are comfortable for lengthy rides.
    • Choppers
      Epitomized by the Harley-Davidson Panhead in the film Captain America, choppers tend to have extremely raked forks, reclined seats, and lots of showy chrome.
    • Cruisers
      Cruisers are like sedate choppers; their fork rake is less extreme, and they're designed for laid-back riding.
    • Dirt Bikes
      Dirt bikes generally refer to motorcyles designed for offroad riding, and typically feature knobby tires, long suspension travel, and minimalistic frames and bodywork. Variants of dirt bike designs compete in Enduro, Motocross, and Trials events, among others.
    • Enduro Bikes
      Designed for long distance offroad competitions, Enduro bikes are usually equipped with headlights and taillights for nighttime riding, and can be outfitted with timers and roll chart reading devices that aid riders with navigation and timekeeping.
    • Naked Bikes
      Naked bikes recall British motorcycles of the sixties, and lack bodywork or a fairing that would normally hide their engines and inner-workings.
    • Power Scooters
      Power scooters are like scooters on steroids, and they share a similar step-through (or near step-through) design. But they also boast large engines (sometimes up to 650cc) rivaling the powerplants found in some motorcycles. Power scooters usually offer commuter-friendly creature comforts and numerous storage compartments.
    • Scooters
      Typified by Italian-made Vespas, scooters are like small motorcycles with bodywork that allows the rider to "step through" and sit without getting his or her clothes stained by oil. Scooter engine sizes can be as little as 50cc.
    • Sport Bikes
      Designed purely for performance, sport bikes tend to require arms-forward posture, powerful engines, and tight handling.
    • Supermoto Bikes
      Based on race machines that compete on a combination of road and dirt surfaces, Supermoto bikes combine offroad characteristics such as deep suspension travel with road tires and bodywork reminiscent of so-called "street fighter" bikes.
    • Touring Bikes
      Created solely for long-distance comfort, touring bikes often feature backrests, large windscreens, and creature comforts such as radios and navigation systems.
    • Trials Bikes
      These specialized competition bikes are tailor made for trials events, in which motorcycles are maneuvered around offroad or man-made obstacles, and riders are penalized if their feet touch the ground. Extremely lightweight, trials bikes lack seats and feature stiffer suspension than most dirtbikes.
    You are to ride the machine, machine is not to ride you..

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    Inspect Your Bike

    T-CLOCS method is an efficient way to inspect your bike before traveling:
    • T: Tires.
      Make sure both tires are properly inflated, using an air pressure monitor that you bring with you on rides. Don't risk riding on tires that might need replacement; if suspect a tire will not last long enough for a ride, have it replaced.
    • C: Controls.
      Are your cables (clutch and brakes) and controls intact and working?
    • L: Lights.
      Make sure your headlights (high & low beam), turn signals, and brake lights work.
    • O: Oils & fluids.
      Check everything from engine oil and coolant to brake fluid.
    • C: Chassis.
      Ensure that the frame, suspension, chain, and fasteners are all secure and intact.
    • S: Stands.
      Make sure the center stand and/or side stand isn't cracked or bent, and that springs properly hold the assembly away from the pavement when stowed.
    You are to ride the machine, machine is not to ride you..

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    How to U-Turn a Motorcycle
    Nessecary info and tips for bikers (Keep Posting) - u turnThe eyes have it: look where you want to go!

    It may look easy, but a smoothly executed u-turn on a motorcycle is more challenging than you might guess. How do you perform a u-turn that looks effortless? Consider these tips and practice them in the safety of an empty parking lot, and you'll find yourself more easily turning your bike around on the street:

    It's All in the Eyes

    The old adage "You'll go where you're looking" holds especially true when it comes to u-turns. That said, don't look down, and keep your line of vision going through the turn, constantly focusing your eyes ahead, where you want to go, rather than towards the pavement below.


    Ride Within the Friction Zone


    The friction zone is the area where your clutch is slipping enough to transmit some, but not all power from the engine to the rear wheel. Don't try to u-turn in neutral, and don't do with a gear fully engaged, either; riding within the friction zone will give you more control over the bike through the throttle, which helps modulate the motorcycles's lean angle through subtle adjustments.

    Drag the Rear Brake


    Avoid using the front brakes during u-turns, as the forks are more sensitive to diving at low speeds. Gentle dragging of the rear brake creates stability, enabling better control while you're maneuvering your bike through the turn.

    Keep Your Weight Mass Centralized


    There's a natural tendency to stick your leg out when you turn (making it ready to break a fall), but your motorcycle will be more manageable when peripheral mass (ie, you!) is closer to the bike. Keep your feet on the pegs; if necessary, you might be helped by putting some weight on the outside peg, in a similar but more subtle way than you would while riding offroad.

    Practice Turning Both Ways


    For whatever reason, most people find it much easier to make tight left turns than right turns. To develop a more balanced u-turn skill set, practice doing figure 8s in an empty parking lot. The drill will build your muscle memory for both sides of your body. Similarly, try riding in a wide circle and narrowing your path so you're forming an ever-narrowing spiral; once you can't turn any more tightly, exit and try it again the other way. Remember to keep looking where you want to go, especially when you're changing directions.
    You are to ride the machine, machine is not to ride you..

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    Thumbs up It Might look lengthy but believe me these are the best tips i have ever found





    What's the proper way to ride a motorcycle? Ask a dozen riders and you'll get a dozen answers. Not even the experts can agree. Take something as simple as steering: Forget that whole push-right-to-go-left deal. Keith Code gave us the Power Pivot, Reg Pridmore preaches body steering and Freddie Spencer stresses trail-braking to change direction. Totally contradictory techniques, yet they all work. Who are we to disagree?

    The thing about riding a motorcycle is there is no one proper way--there are lots of ways. And you never stop learning. Take what you hear or read or see or are taught, think about it, give it a go, and if it works, make it your own. Then share it with your friends.

    As a journalist, racer and track-day instructor, I've been doing just that for more than two decades now. Drawing from that experience, I've compiled 20 tips that, for one reason or another, have stuck in my craw for lo these many years. Most I got straight from the source, a few I read in books or magazines, but all are nuggets of information that have served me well. I hope they do the same for you.

    1. Keith Code
    LEARN TO THINK FOR YOURSELF

    Say what you will about the guru, Keith Code wrote the book on high-performance motorcycle riding and it's called A Twist of the Wrist. Twenty-three years after it was first published, it's still tops on my list. I took Code's California Superbike School twice in 1984 and '85, and at first found his teaching style frustrating. Asked the best line through a corner, he turned the question back to me: "I don't know. There are lots of correct lines. They change depending on what bike you're riding, the condition of your tires, etc. What line do you think is correct?" What I thought was I'd better learn to think for myself.

    2. Wes Cooley
    KEEP YOUR CHEST ON THE TANK

    The second time I took the California Superbike School, Wes Cooley was a guest instructor. I was impressed by how tidy he was on the bike--always tucked in behind the windscreen without any limbs sticking out in the breeze. Later, he told the class a funny story: "One day I came in from practice and my dad told me I needed to stay tucked in. I told him I had, so he tied a shoelace from my zipper to the ignition key. When I came back in after the next session, my leathers were unzipped to my waist." Keeping your chest on the tank not only improves your bike's aerodynamics, it lowers the center of gravity and gives the front tire a better bite.

    Nessecary info and tips for bikers (Keep Posting) - 122 0610 01 zlessons learnedjohn kocinski
    John Kocinski Spanish Gran...

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    3. John Kocinski
    TRUST YOUR TIRES

    Everyone frets about cold tires, especially when they're fresh from the molds. Not John Kocinski. In the years before John Boy won the 1990 250cc world championship, I covered the AMA 250cc Grand Prix series for Cycle News, and can recall him routinely going to the starting grid on unscrubbed slicks. "That's OK, I'll just push the front a couple of times on the warm-up lap and they'll be fine," I once heard him tell Dunlop's Jim Allen. This was years before tire-warmers were invented, incidentally. Kocinski's competitors were quick to point out he got the good Dunlops straight from the GPs, but it wasn't his tires that won him three consecutive titles, it was his confidence.

    4. Danny Coe
    ALWAYS UPSHIFT AFTER MISSING A GEAR

    Back in the late '80s, Danny Coe of Cycle magazine was a top AMA 250cc GP competitor and unofficial champion of the Moto-Journalist GPs. When during a GSX-R launch at Laguna Seca I mentioned I'd botched a downshift, he asked me what I did next. "Um, I downshifted again." Wrong: Coe insisted you should always shift up after missing a shift, to ensure you're not a gear lower than you intended. Better to be out of the powerband than to have the rear tire hopping up and down, trying to pass the front.

    5. Jason Pridmore
    HUG THE CURVES

    In '93 I rode for Kawasaki at the Willow Springs 24-Hour, and one of my teammates was Jason Pridmore. This was long before he established his STAR Motorcycle School, but he'd been instructing with his father's CLASS organization and had become adept at identifying riders' shortcomings. He followed me for a few laps during practice and afterward told me I needed to run tighter lines. Where I'd go through a corner with my knee on the white line, Jason would take it with his knee on or even over the curb. More often than not, the shortest path around a racetrack is the quickest.

    6. Dale Quarterley
    GIVE TO GET

    During my six-year tenure as a race reporter for American Roadracing and Cycle News, there were two riders I could count on to give me a straight answer. One of those was Dale Quarterley. At 6-foot-2 and 190 pounds, the New Englander was too big to ever have been considered for a factory ride, but at Mid-Ohio in 1993 he won an AMA Superbike national--the last privateer to do so. He was a guest instructor when I took the Penguin School at Loudon that year, and his pet phrase was "give to get"--that is, you've got to give up speed at the corner entrance to get it back at the end of the following straight. Rushing a corner entrance only ruins your drive at the exit.

    7. Randy Renfrow
    NEVER GIVE UP

    I miss this guy. Randy Renfrow was one of the nicest guys in motorcycle racing, but also one of the most determined. Not even having a toe grafted on to replace a lost thumb could extinguish his competitive spirit. Racing with Ducati-mounted Dale Quarterley for the lead of a Pro Twins race at Heartland Park Topeka circa 1989, Renfrow lost the front end of his Common-wealth Honda RS750 and fell to the ground, yet somehow managed to pull himself back on board and continue on to victory. "Bikes don't fall down, riders drag them down," he told me afterward. Ironically, it wasn't a crash that claimed Renfrow's life; it was a freak fall down a flight of stairs while recovering from one.

    Nessecary info and tips for bikers (Keep Posting) - 122 0610 02 zlessons learnedkevin schwantz
    Kevin Schwantz Dutch TT, ...

    read full caption



    8. Kevin Schwantz
    LOOK WHERE YOU'RE GOING

    Book of Duh, Chapter One, but Kevin Schwantz's take is refreshing, especially for those of us whose height (or girth, or both) makes crawling under the paint difficult. Sure, the 1993 500cc world champion tucked in on the straights, but not as much as his rivals; he'd raise his head just enough to look over--or around--the windscreen. Like they taught you in Driver's Ed, looking farther down the road gives you a big-picture view that effectively slows things down--an important consideration at triple-digit speeds.

    9. Steve Crevier
    RIDE PROUD

    Jockey-sized multi-time Canadian Superbike Champion Steve Crevier started out racing lightweight 250s, and after moving up to heavier production bikes realized he needed to change his riding style. Sitting bolt upright in the saddle--or "riding proud," as he called it--helped him maximize his leverage on the handlebars. As a track-day instructor, I've quoted Crevier countless times while trying to get new riders to focus on riding the motorcycle first and assuming the position later. When you start dragging hard parts, it's time to hang off. Until then, ride proud.

    10. Doug Polen
    THE FAST LINE ISN'T ALWAYS OBVIOUS

    For the past seven years I've instructed with The Track Club at Buttonwillow Raceway, thus I know the track like the back of my hand. But after taking part in one of Doug Polen's One-on-One training sessions with radio communication, my idea of the right line was dramatically altered. B-Willow has two sections with three corners in a row, and everyone swoops back and forth across the track to negotiate them. Everyone except Polen: The former AMA and World Superbike champion stays hard on the gas way past the customary braking point for the first corner, trail-brakes straight up the inside of the second, hugs the apex and then gets a killer drive out of the third. Freddie Spencer has a term for this; he calls it "throwing out a corner."

    Nessecary info and tips for bikers (Keep Posting) - 122 0610 03 zlessons learnededdie lawson scott russell
    Eddie Lawson & Scott Russell...

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    11. Eddie Lawson
    LEARN HOW YOUR SUSPENSION WORKS

    When Eddie Lawson returned from the 500cc Grand Prix wars to ride a Vance & Hines Yamaha Superbike in the 1993 Daytona 200, he had to get a handle on an unfamiliar motorcycle without the benefit of prior testing. To do so, he spent his initial practice sessions exploring the full range of suspension and chassis adjustments before he even tried to go fast. The results were predictable: He won the race after an epic battle with Mr. Daytona, Scott Russell. And then went onto a modestly successful career in Indycar racing, where his methodical approach served him equally well.

    12. Scott Russell
    STEER WITH THE REAR

    Once upon a time (1994), in a land far, far away (Malaysia), there was a press introduction for the then-new Kawasaki ZX-9R. It was hot--really hot--and the sketchy stock Bridge-stone tires gave me fits until I watched Scott Russell ride. Undaunted by the lack of traction (he'd experienced worse at the end of races), the reigning World Superbike champion set a blistering pace 4 seconds per lap quicker than the fastest journalist, and slewed sideways off the corners in complete control. How'd he do that? Simple: He weighted the inside footpeg to break the rear tire loose, then weighted the outside peg to get it to hook back up.

    13. David Sadowski
    BE YOUR OWN SLIPPER CLUTCH

    Talk to anyone who raced with David Sadowski and they'll more likely tell you about his balls than his brains. But as the 1990 Daytona 200 winner's racing results and subsequent stint as a television commentator proved, Ski gave a lot of thought to his racing. One year at Daytona I was chatting with Doug Polen while waiting for the riders' meeting to start, when up walks Sadowski with a newspaper. On the cover was a photo of Polen entering Turn 1 with his hand still visibly squeezing his Ducati's clutch lever. The ensuing dialogue was enlightening as the two discussed the merits of trailing the clutch to the apex to modulate engine braking and thus prevent rear wheel hop. Nowadays we've got slipper clutches to do this for us, but it's still a useful technique.

    14. Doug Chandler
    SAVE A SLIDE

    What do you do when the rear end starts coming around on the throttle? According to three-time AMA Superbike Champion Doug Chandler, the answer is: nothing. And he should know. With wins in all four disciplines of AMA Grand National dirt-track competition and Supermoto, he obviously knows how to slide a motor-cycle. According to him, when the rear tire starts sliding, the last thing you want to do is chop the throttle; instead, simply stop adding throttle until the tire hooks back up. A one-time Keith Code protg (he wrote the liner notes for A Twist of the Wrist 2), Chandler recently started a riding school (www.champ-racing.com) and one of his first graduates was his son, Jett.

    Nessecary info and tips for bikers (Keep Posting) - 122 0610 04 zlessons learnedkenny roberts
    Kenny Roberts Dutch TT, 1...

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    15. Kenny Roberts
    GO FAST IN THE FAST PARTS

    Three-time 500cc World Champion Kenny Roberts doesn't believe in coasting--you're either on the gas or on the brakes. The most important corner on any racetrack is the one that leads onto the longest (and thus fastest) straightaway, so Roberts would put a priority on getting that section right. Trying to go fast in slower corners is not only pointless, it's risky, because you don't have momentum on your side. If the front tire loses grip in a fast turn, you've got time to save it. If it lets go in a slow one, it's game over.

    16. David Aldana
    CONSIDER THE FRONT BRAKE LEVER AND THROTTLE CONTROL AS ONE CONTROL

    I'm not old enough to have raced with David Aldana, but there was a period in the '90s when he did some testing for Roadracing World and I was fortunate to spend time with him. Bones (so nicknamed because of his infamous skeleton leathers) is nothing if not animated, and it was while he was regaling us with one of his zany racing tales that I detected a pattern in his hand-and-wrist motions. I mentioned this to him, and he replied that he considered the front brake lever and throttle as one control; you squeeze the lever as you close the throttle, and release it as you open it.

    Nessecary info and tips for bikers (Keep Posting) - 122 0610 05 zlessons learnedfreddie spencer
    Freddie Spencer British GP,...

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    17. Freddie Spencer
    BRAKE WHERE YOU NEED TO, NOT WHERE YOU THINK YOU SHOULD

    I've taken the Freddie Spencer High Performance Riding School twice, at nine-year intervals. And while the curriculum has changed, the message remains the same: Be smooth. "Fast riders have slow hands," Spencer says, and then puts you on the back of his Honda VFR to show you what he means. The three-time world champion doesn't snatch at the brake lever; he squeezes it like the trigger of a gun, and releases it just as gently. Moreover, he uses braking pressure to get the bike to change direction, tightening his line as speed decreases. Freddie doesn't rigidly adhere to brake markers, either; he's more flexible, braking earlier or later and making adjustments mid-corner as necessary.

    18. Marco Lucchinelli
    USE THE REAR BRAKE

    I took the Ducati Riding Experience racing course at Misano, Italy, a few years ago, and my instructor was 1981 500cc World Champion Marco Lucchinelli. Belying his nickname, Lucky spent time in prison on drug charges and frankly wasn't riding like a man who had beaten racing greats with names such as Roberts and Rossi--or at least their dads. The only memorable advice he gave me was, "You should use the rear brake." When I asked him why, he said, "Because there are two," and then explained how using the rear brake to scrub off unwanted speed mid-corner is safer than adding more front brake pressure.

    19. Barry Veneman
    GIVE IT FULL STICK

    How did a Dutch Supersport racer make this list? During the international Masterbike competition at Valencia, Spain, in 2005, I was talking to Barry Veneman and heard him condense the act of going fast into the simplest possible terms: "Choose lines that let you get to full throttle the soonest." Bazza explained that before he was exposed to data acquisition in the 500cc GPs, he had no idea how little time he spent at full stick--typically less than 10 percent of a lap. So he started picking lines that let him pin the throttle as early as possible, making sure he felt it click against the stop.

    20. Rickey Gadson

    DON'T LAUNCH AT REDLINE


    And so it ends--at the beginning. Watch the start of any roadrace and you'll likely see 30 riders doing it wrong. I know--I was one of them. It wasn't until a couple of years ago that Pro dragracer Rickey Gadson set me straight. Most roadracers hold their engines at or near redline and then dump the clutch, resulting in a wild wheelie, a squawking clutch or both. Rickey does it differently: He holds engine revs at peak torque, not peak horsepower, lets out the clutch quickly and then pins the throttle. His launches are unspectacular affairs, the only excitement the howl of the rear tire--and the killer 60-foot time he just laid down. Believe me, you wouldn't want to race him for pinks
    You are to ride the machine, machine is not to ride you..

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    Lightbulb Safai Nisf emaan Hai :)

    Why Wash it Yourself, and What You'll Need
    Nessecary info and tips for bikers (Keep Posting) - WashingSupplies


    Whether you own a custom cruiser or a souped up sport bike, you'll want to keep your motorcycle away from commercial washing facilities and perform the cleaning ritual yourself. Those high-pressure hoses can damage bike parts, which are more vulnerable than mechanical parts in cars.
    Be sure you find a shady spot to wash (and dry) your bike, since the sun can create temperature differentials that harm paint and allow water to leave spots.
    Assemble the following items as needed:

    • A bucket for soapy water ( Put surf or detergent in water)
    • Soap or liquid detergent; automotive cleaners will work
    • Gloves (to keep your hands clean)
    • Bug and tar remover
    • Degreaser and/or engine cleaner (easily found in our markets in PAKISTAN)
    • A toothbrush
    • WD40
    • A brush for wheel cleaning
    • Wheel cleaner
    • At least two microfiber or 100% cotton sponges ( use Scoth Brite )
    • A variety of soft cotton towels and more abrasive rags
    • A chamois cloth for drying (Dry "mal mal" ka kapra)
    You are to ride the machine, machine is not to ride you..

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    Prepping the Water
    Nessecary info and tips for bikers (Keep Posting) - FillingBucketUsing warm water will increase its solvency.

    While some people swear by washing their bikes with plain water, others insist on using specific brands of soap. Whatever your style, use warm water with the mix and fill up a bucket for convenience.
    Keep the sponge nearby, and don't let it touch the ground (since it can pick up pebbles or abrasive particles that could damage your paint.)
    You are to ride the machine, machine is not to ride you..

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    De-Bug!
    Nessecary info and tips for bikers (Keep Posting) - BugsBugs and grime congregate on the nose.

    Dead bugs and grime are the bane of every motorcyclist, but using the right tools will get them off your paint easier than you think.
    Bug and tar removers work surprisingly well, and some people also use WD40 for this duty. Don't scrub too hard into the paint when loosening bugs, and be sure not to use the same sponge for other cleaning duties.
    You are to ride the machine, machine is not to ride you..

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    Getting the Hard Parts Clean
    Nessecary info and tips for bikers (Keep Posting) - ScrubbingSwingarmExhaustBe sure not to let degreasers touch sensitive parts like paint or chrome.

    A motorcycle's hard parts (like the swingarm and matte exhaust pipes seen here) require different treatment than more sensitive parts (like paint or chrome.)
    Using a degreaser, scrub hard parts carefully and individually, making sure not to let the powerful solvents touch paint or chrome. No need to use microfiber materials here; a rough rag will do.
    Some people use oven cleaner to remove boot marks from chrome exhaust pipes, but extra care must be taken to keep strong cleaners away from the sensitive bits.
    You are to ride the machine, machine is not to ride you..

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    Don't Forget the Nooks and Crannies
    Nessecary info and tips for bikers (Keep Posting) - EngineScrubbingHard to reach parts can be cleaned with a toothbrush

    You might not need to get your motorcycle to concours condition, but a toothbrush will go a long way towards making hard to reach parts look clean. Apply degreaser on the tip for non-chrome engine parts, and oil and grime will disappear.
    You are to ride the machine, machine is not to ride you..

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    Erasing Brake Dust
    Nessecary info and tips for bikers (Keep Posting) - WheelScrubbingUse a brush to scrub wheels, and keep brake dust off your sponge.

    Wheels can be difficult to clean, and a long-armed brush is usually the best way scrub off brake dust and dirt. Apply a wheel cleaner first and let it settle before scrubbing it off. Chrome wheels will require specific cleaners, so be aware of your wheel's finish before purchasing a cleaner.
    Don't use tire dressing products, as their glossy finishes can compromise grip.
    You are to ride the machine, machine is not to ride you..

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    Washing the Body
    Nessecary info and tips for bikers (Keep Posting) - BodyScrubbingBe sure and get all the contours you can with the sponge.

    Microfiber sponge gloves are great ways to clean a bike's painted parts, and should be used with warm, soapy water from the bucket in Step #2. Be sure to get the paint good and wet before scrubbing, so the soapy water can act as a lubricant and not scratch the paint. Only use 100% cotton or microfiber sponges, as other materials can cause damage.
    Rinse the soapy residue off with a gentle stream of water from a hose, or by pouring water from the bucket.
    You are to ride the machine, machine is not to ride you..

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    Last But Not Least, Dry
    Nessecary info and tips for bikers (Keep Posting) - DryingA chamois cloth will keep your paint from getting scratched.

    With your bike still parked in the shade, use a chamois cloth to soak up the moisture from the paint. The chamois will keep the finish from getting scratched, and prevent streaks and spots from accumulating.
    Feel free to reward yourself with a ride on your newly cleaned bike; not only will you enjoy the breeze after all your hard work, the air movement will dry out many of the parts you might not have been able to reach while you were drying it.
    You are to ride the machine, machine is not to ride you..

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    i will come up with more ..............
    You are to ride the machine, machine is not to ride you..

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    Lightbulb The All Important Chain - Why Your Motorcycle Chain Matters

    Nessecary info and tips for bikers (Keep Posting) - ChainActionHard acceleration or deceleration puts added strain on motorcycle chains, as seen in this picture.


    Why should I care about motorcycle chains?

    Motorcycle chain maintenance, along with oil changes and tire maintenance is a crucial part of safe riding. Chains are the unsung mechanical heroes of motorcycling; they're responsible for the crucial task of transferring power from the engine to the rear wheel, and without proper inspection and maintenance, can fail and cripple the motorcycle, or worse, become dangerous projectiles.

    This tutorial covers three essential aspects of chain care: inspection, cleaning, and adjustment.
    How often should chains be inspected and adjusted?

    Depending on how aggressively you ride, chains should be inspected every 500-700 miles, or roughly twice a month. What items will I need on hand for chain maintenance?

    Keep the following items on hand:
    • Various wrenches.
    • A soft brush, or old toothbrush.
    • An O-ring friendly chain cleaner (if, like most chains, yours is of an o-ring type.)
    • O-ring friendly chain lubricant (again, if applicable.)
    • A new cotter pin (when adjusting the chain tension.)
    • Rags (for wiping grime off the chain.)
    • A rubber mallet (optional.)
    • A rear wheel stand (optional.)
    • A tape measure (optional.)
    You are to ride the machine, machine is not to ride you..

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    Lightbulb How to Inspect a Motorcycle Chain

    Nessecary info and tips for bikers (Keep Posting) - Measure2Using a tape measure or visual estimation, grasp the chain and make sure it moves about one inch in either direction.


    Using a tape measure (or visual estimation, if necessary), grasp the chain at a point halfway between the front and rear sprockets, and pull it up and down. The chain should be able to move roughly one inch up and one inch down. If your motorcycle is on a rear stand or centerstand, note that the swingarm will drop if the wheel is lifted from the ground, which will affect the rear geometry and the tension in the chain; compensate accordingly, if necessary.

    Because motorcycle chains can stiffen in certain spots and stay pliable in others, it's important to roll the bike forward (or turn the rear wheel if it's on a stand) and check all sections of the chain. If it moves more than about an inch, the chain will need tightening, and if it's too tight, loosening will be in order; this is outlined in subsequent steps. If individual chain links are too tight, the chain might need replacement.
    You are to ride the machine, machine is not to ride you..

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    Lightbulb Inspect Your Motorcycle's Sprockets

    Nessecary info and tips for bikers (Keep Posting) - FrontSprocketInspect the sprocket for wear closely; the shape of the teeth will tell a lot about how the bike was ridden and maintained.



    Front and rear sprocket teeth are good indicators of maladjusted chains; inspect the teeth to make sure they are meshing well with the chain. If the sides of the teeth are worn, chance are they haven't been seating well with the chain (which probably shows corresponding wear.) Wave-shaped teeth wear is another irregularity that might suggest that you need new sprockets.
    You are to ride the machine, machine is not to ride you..

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    Lightbulb Clean Your Motorcycle Chain

    Nessecary info and tips for bikers (Keep Posting) - LubeSpray3Don't run your engine to get parts moving while you spray them; it's far safer to put the transmission in neutral and manually spin the rear wheel. Also, make sure the cleaner you spray is rated for o-rings, if your bike chain is so equipped.



    Whether or not your chain needs adjusting, you'll want to keep it clean and well-lubricated. Most modern chains are o-ring types which use rubber components, and are sensitive to certain solvents. Make sure you use an o-ring approved cleaning agent when you spray the chain and sprockets or use a soft brush to apply the cleaner.
    You are to ride the machine, machine is not to ride you..

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    Lightbulb Wipe Off Excess Grime

    Nessecary info and tips for bikers (Keep Posting) - RearSprocketWipeWiping off grime is one of the messier parts of chain maintenance.


    Next, you'll want to wipe off the excess grime using a rag or towel, which will create a clean surface that's friendlier to lubricants. Be sure to thoroughly reach all the sprocket teeth and chain links by rolling the rear wheel (or the entire bike, if it's not on a stand.)
    You are to ride the machine, machine is not to ride you..

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    Lightbulb Lubricate Your Chain

    Nessecary info and tips for bikers (Keep Posting) - LubeSprayinsideUsing proper lubricants will lengthen chain life considerably.


    While rotating the wheel, evenly spray a layer of lubricant across the chain as it runs along the sprockets. Wipe off excess lubricant with a rag.
    You are to ride the machine, machine is not to ride you..

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