Production of Mark II and Mark X comes to an end!


After 51 mighty years of production and success on 23rd December, Toyota decided to halt the production of the Mark II and Mark X sedan. The final model, a white mark X, was the last one to be manufactured in line at Toyota’s second oldest plant, the Motomachi factory in Aichi Prefecture. The vehicle was promptly headed to a little sendoff where it was parked next to the first-ever Corona Mark II, the vehicle that began everything.

The Mark II started life as a branch of the Corona line, with an extended nose and greater motor choices. It enabled Toyota to offer close Crown extravagance in a white-collar class vehicle and turned out to be famous to such an extent that it generated its own suspension code and nameplate.

As a matter of fact, it brought forth three nameplates in Japan and another abroad. There was the bread and butter Mark II, the sportier Chaser, and the more formal and preservationist Cresta. In the event that you got one in the US, it was known as the Cressida. It turned into the conclusive white-collar class vehicle and opponent Nissan endeavored to clash with the Skyline, Laurel, and Cefiro, however, Toyota had them beat.

At its pinnacle, just before the air pocket burst, Toyota was selling a dumbfounding 20,000 or more units for each month. As of now, there were 20 Mark II varieties for the Japanese market and 28 varieties for abroad, a blend of body styles, motors, and transmissions. Toyota had, at no other time, offered countless such models all the while in a huge scale large scale manufacturing.

In 1990, the X70 age demonstrated so hotly that it even out-sold the Corolla and arrived at number one in Japanese deals outlines. As per an organization representative, Toyota sold 6,518,000 Mark II (overall nameplates) and 363,500 Mark X taking all things together for an excellent aggregate of 6,881,500.

One production line couldn’t stay aware of the interest. The Motomachi manufacturing plant worked about a large portion of the generation run, 3,495,000 units (the rest were part between Kanto Auto Works, Higashi-Fuji, and Kyushu Miyata). On the day the last Mark X was constructed, Toyota held a little send-off went to by around 200 representatives. In any case, in an uncommon move, Toyota opened the function to non-representatives. Notwithstanding the first and only ages, 1979, 1984, and 1988 Mark IIs were in plain view to respect the visitors.

Plant supervisor Hiroyoshi Ninoyu, who joined the organization in the mid-1980s, had given 35 years of his life to Mark II, addressing to the devotes said, “When I joined Toyota I was training at a Corolla dealership, and everyone around me was telling me to buy an AE86. I put that aside, and on a sunny day, I bought a fifth-generation [X70] Mark II. It had a huge presence for me, and it was love at first sight. I think the styling is beautiful even now.”

Ninoyu portrayed that at top notoriety, in light of the fact that Motomachi was the essential industrial facility for the model, generation went into additional time consistently. He prepared many line laborers, watched them develop throughout the years, and accepts everybody at Motomachi is extremely glad to have assembled the Mark II and Mark X.

Surprisingly, due to the introduction of VANs and SUVs, sales of mark X and mark II models have gone through a significant downfall. In 2017, Toyota sold just 8,460 Mark X models, and 2018 was even more dismal at just 4,108.

Addressing the situation, Ninoyu said, “We couldn’t beat the wave of one-boxes and SUVs, but we found that there were still many enthusiasts who wanted a manual transmission, rear-wheel-drive car.” This was a reference to Gazoo Racing’s limited-production GRMN models, of which 100 were built in 2015 and 350 in 2019”.

“Both sold out immediately, so I thought, ‘There’s no car that was so beloved,’ Ninoyu continued. “I’m really proud and really happy to be able to send off the final car with you today. I’ve been supporting the Mark X and three Mark II brothers for a long time. I’d like to thank all those who have done so as well.”

(The original Mark II)

It was a ceremonious goodbye as, after 51 years and 11 glorious generations, the Mark II and Mark X chapter has come to an end.


Google App Store App Store
Awais Yousaf

I'm a crazy car guy. I want an aeroplane hangar full of cars. Is that too much to ask for?

  • Guest

    The article has been totally copied from japanesenostalgiccar and run through some crappy para-phrasing software which translates “on display” as “in plain view” and “bubble” as “air pocket”. It was published on japanesenostalgiccar on 3rd Jan 2020 and copied without credit on PW on 8th Jan.

Top